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In conversation with Graphic Philatelist, Blair Thomson

We caught up with Blair Thomson, co-author of Graphic Stamps [Unit 24], and the man behind Graphilately. Since publishing Graphic Stamps, what has been the response to your growing collection?Blair Thomson: I’ve had nothing but positive vibes since the release of Graphic Stamps [Unit 24], and seen it reach many diverse audiences through some amazing features and reviews in national and international publications, both online and in print. My motivation with Graphilately has always been to expose design of this nature outside the comforts of my own graphic design bubble. Which it certainly has, beyond all expectations.Recently a selection of ‘politically charged’ stamps were sent to Seattle to feature in the ‘Design of Dissent’ exhibition (originally curated by Milton Glaser and Mirko Ilic) which the recent US elections prompted studio Civilization to...

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Graphic Stamps of Countries Neglected in Graphic Design History

Israel, 1980–1982. Design: G. Sagi 'More than just miniature beauties, stamps offer a flavour of their time,' notes Iain Follet, one of the two stamp design experts that helped compile this book, ‘Different countries, through different periods in their histories, kept varying levels of records.’Here we take a look at philatelic offerings from countries sometimes neglected in graphic design history: Singapore, 1983. Design: Eng Siak LoyPeru, 1973. Designer unknown ‘As designers we always appreciate the additional level of detail: sublime typography, special inks, embossing and foils, tactile materials, print process effects. Certainly from a collector’s perspective these add a layer of appreciation and value beyond the ordinary’Blair Thomson Ecuador, 1975. Designer unknownColombia, 1972. Design: C. Rojas ‘As Unit’s Adrian Shaughnessy...

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Pushing the Envelope with April's Book of the Month, Graphic Stamps

‘Design is what drew me towards stamps’ says Iain Follet. It’s this sentiment that drew us to his, and fellow philatelist, Blair Thomson’s impeccable collection of the miniature beauties for the launch of our Archive Series.  Here's what Smith Journal had to say:‘The stamps in the book aren’t fusty. They’re modernist clarion calls that celebrate the many achievements of the 20th century: Olympics, expos, television, railways, air travel, skyscrapers, nuclear energy, the space race, higher education, the United Nations. They come from an era when nothing was thought too good for us, when public art was shoehorned into social housing estates, office blocks and schools, when culture was democratised en masse’ ‘Most collectors cherish the older stamps, the rarities, the misprints....

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In conversation with Andreas Uebele

A major presence in contemporary German graphic design, Andreas Uebele’s work is a barometer of expressive and experimental graphic design. Ahead of the release of his new monograph, andreas uebele material [Unit 32], we spoke with the designer about what's on his shelves and how an architect becomes a graphic designer.  We know you began your career in architecture, what attracted you to graphic design?AU: It happened by coincidence at the age of seventeen, when writing hopeful love letters it became clear to me that I got better results when they were well designed. I designed the envelopes and realised that design is something that suits me. Wayfinding and environmental typography occupy a large space in büro ueble’s portfolio, does...

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Adventures in Typography with Tony Brook & Claudia Klat

What is SPIN/Adventures in Typography? How did it come about? Tony Brook: It was an itch that needed to be scratched. We’d been making a lot of experimental work, that wasn't necessarily featuring in commercial projects, but still wanted to explore further. I wanted to carry on the conversation from the Spin 360° monograph – to carry on exploring creative possibilities for type, and there wasn't really a place in the book for that. Spin 360° was never meant to be an end, but more a conversation starter. So this is just the next stage of it. Why the journal format? Tony Brook: It’s just practical. It's not too expensive. It encourages us to keep on pushing and trying things. It's...

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What's in Andreas Uebele's sketchbook?

What’s in Andreas Uebele’s sketchbook?From the graphics for the Reichstag to the signage for the Adidas headquarters, Andreas Uebele’s experimental work is a benchmark for expressive and ground breaking graphic design. A major presence in contemporary German graphic design, Uebele originally trained as an architect, a visible influence on much of his work today.Here we reveal a glimpse of those sparks that kindle his creative process, our favourite pages from his sketchbooks, where we investigate what informs his radical typography and bold environmental graphics: Previously featured in Unit Editions books, we’re delighted to publish his latest book andreas uebele material monograph volume 3 [Unit 32]. Sign up to our newsletter for more details!  

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Open Call: SPIN/Adventures in Typography Tumblr

Everyone has a file somewhere of the stuff that didn’t make the final cut. We’ve set up a Tumblr to continue the conversation started with SPIN/Adventures in Typography; a space dedicated to the material that usually remains unseen, and experimental type that hasn’t found a home yet. If you feel like sharing your specimens, send them to adventures@uniteditions.com, we’ll curate and post them on the SPIN/Adventures in Typography Tumblr, and tell everyone about them on various digital soapboxes.  You can send as many specimens as you like. We need the following details: Project name  Project date  Designer(s) Studio Brief project description (50 words max) 

We look forward to seeing your creative experiments, riffs, and remixes!  SPIN/Adventures in Typography [Unit 31]...

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A new book from leading German graphic designer Andreas Uebele

Andreas Uebele is a major presence in contemporary German graphic design. He trained as an architect, and much of his work as a graphic designer is architecture related. His environmental graphics, and radical typography, have been featured in previous Unit Editions books, and now we’re delighted to publish his latest book.

 Whether hanging Goethe’s words on the streets of Hanoi or visually translating the word schmuck, the work of Andreas Uebele and his studio Buro Uebele is a bench mark for expressive and ground breaking graphic design. Coming soon: andreas uebele material [Unit 32]Watch this space for more details! 

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SPIN/Adventures in Typography (Issue 001)

‘Experimenting with letterforms is a natural part of making, often born out of enthusiasm rather than commercial or practical imperatives’Tony BrookSPIN/Adventures in Typography looks at the typographic flotsam and jetsam of Spin’s creative process. It’s a repository for trains of thought, itches that needed to be scratched, as well as fresh new ideas. It continues the conversation started with the studio’s 2015 monograph SPIN 360° [Unit 19].SPIN/Adventures in Typography is a visual record of Spin's creative interests and outputs – combustive explorations not afraid to plunge into the abstract, teetering on the edge of legibility. A journal boisterous with typographic riffs, remixes, and rearrangements – SPIN/Adventures in Typography is an invitation to engage in conversation, an ellipses rather than a full...

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Designing design magazines: Talk & panel discussion at St. Bride

On February 16th we celebrated the publication of Impact 1.0 and Impact 2.0, with a talk and panel discussion at St. Bride.Here are some of the insights unearthed during Adrian Shaughnessy’s chat with Teal Triggs (RCA), Richard Spencer Powell (Monocle), Solveig Suess (Concrete Flux), Jeremy Leslie (MagCulture) and Tony Brook (Spin/Unit Editions). ‘Digital is catchy, but it goes in one eye and out the other.’Jeremy Leslie‘I know Brexit is bad. Trump is bad. But, the Economist’s sales are up. People want to read news in longform.’ Richard Spencer Powell‘Many magazines might be struggling. But, there are hundreds of stimulating, niche magazines - about things you’ve never known you were interested in.’ Tony Brook‘Aesthetic journalism is visual culture as an investigative means.’Solveig...

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